Buried Under Books

Category: Book Reviews


REVIEW: ‘a suitable lie’ by Michael J Malone

There are some secrets you should never keep. When widower and single father Andy Boyd meets Anna, he can’t believe his luck. When he ends up in hospital on his wedding night, Andy refuses to see this as a warning sign and enters a world of lies that may cost him everything. What’s it about? […]

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REVIEW: ‘The Nightmare Place’ by Steve Mosby

Are you the person you want to be? While Steve Mosby’s ‘The Nightmare Place’ is primarily a crime thriller focused on the hunt to catch a violent serial offender, it has quite a strong tilt towards self judgement and self assessment, which I found interesting. DI Zoe Dolan could have turned into a criminal herself, […]

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REVIEW: ‘things in jars’ by Jess Kidd

Victorian gothic: possibly my favourite genre. Here, Jess Kidd creates a darkly poetic and watery tale. At it’s heart: Bridie Devine, formerly a resurrectionist’s girl, then a medic’s trusted extra hands, and finally a private detective with a penchant for mind altering blends of tobacco and the odd nip of Madeira. I felt like I […]

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REVIEW: ‘The Lies We Told’ by Camilla Way

‘At first I mistook the severed head for something else. It wasn’t until I was very close that I realised it was Lucy.’ I do love an effective opening sentence, and my word this one grabbed me. To my delight, the words and chapters that followed were equally compelling, and all of a sudden it […]

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REVIEW: ‘The Pain of Suicide’ by Dr Jo-Ann Rowland

When a loved one takes their own life, we are stunned. Even if it was expected – and often it isn’t – we wonder how they can have taken themselves away from us. Dr Jo-Ann Rowland sought to investigate some of the whys by focusing on a specific sub-set of one community with a high […]

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REVIEW: ‘Blood Symmetry’ by Kate Rhodes

Forensics and psychological profiling are probably my favourite crime fiction elements. Kate Rhodes uses both effectively to create a fast paced and rather gruesome tale in ‘Blood Symmetry’, her fifth novel in her popular Alice Quentin series. What’s it about? Clare Riordan is out running with her son, Mikey, one morning when they are both […]

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REVIEW: ‘the last night out’ by Catherine O’Connell

Six friends. Three secrets. One murder. The strapline of this novel suggests a crime thriller, but if that’s what you’re seeking, you might not find it here. A woman dies, that’s true, but somehow her death immediately becomes less important than the sex lives of the living. What’s it about? Maggie’s hen party is a […]

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REVIEW: ‘the disappearance of Emily Marr’ by Louise Candlish

Louise Candlish is a thoroughly contemporary author. In this, her ninth book, she explores the awful impact of trial by media after a woman’s adultery leads to tragedy. I was really looking forward to reading this, having previously read and enjoyed Candlish’s later novels, ‘The Swimming Pool‘ and ‘The Sudden departure of the Frasers’, and […]

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REVIEW: ‘Dead Opposite the Church’ by Francis Vivian

Dead Opposite the Church The factual title gives you a feel for how this crime novel will develop: facts are followed by facts and little intuition is needed to connect them, which is just as well, as our main protagonist is rather short on intuition… What’s it about? Edward Packman ran his weekly newspaper as […]

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REVIEW: ‘Who Killed Dick Whittington?’ by E. & M. A. Radford

Puzzle fans rejoice: DI Manson is on the case. As part of their ongoing mission to revive excellent but neglected authors, Dean Street Press are reissuing some of the most entertaining golden age crime fiction. ‘Who Killed Dick Whittington’ (written by husband and wife writing team E. & M. A. Radford) is indeed a classic […]

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