Buried Under Books

Category: Non-fiction


unmumsy mum diary

REVIEW ‘The Unmumsy Mum Diary’: recording life with small children…honestly

‘Mummy blogging’ is big news lately. In what seems to be a backlash against the mythical ideal of Perfect Parenting, especially Perfect Mothering, and Instagram worthy (#SoBlessed) family life, many bloggers are choosing to share their lives with small children, warts and all temper tantrums, last-minute school run dashes and all. Some particularly entertaining voices within […]

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the unmumsy mum

REVIEW ‘The Unmumsy mum’ shares her honest thoughts on parenting

Babies. Toddlers. Pre-schoolers. They’re delightful and amazing and awful and infuriating, switching seamlessly from adorable minx to terrible brat – and back again – in a matter of seconds. (“I said say SORRY to your SISTER. Say SORRY TO YOUR SISTER NOW! Oh, what a lovely cuddle. Ah, I’m sure she loves you, too, she […]

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Sheperdess

Review: ‘A Year in the Life of the Yorkshire Shepherdess’

1 husband, 8 children, 1,000 sheep… It’s testament to Amanda Owen’s busy lifestyle that the strap line for her second book – released in hardback at the end of last year and in paperback today – is already out of date; she now has nine children. (How? I mean, seriously. I find three small people […]

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image

‘Hurrah for Gin’: a book for perfectly imperfect parents

Parenting: everyone has opinions and most people are full of advice. Katie Kirby knows better. She knows that parents do their best, that the material they have to work with is occasionally (indeed – often) nearly impossible to fathom or direct, and that amusing anecdotes are far more helpful than any well-meaning advice. With that […]

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raising girls

‘Raising Girls’ in a media-saturated, critical world

Girls are in the news – for all the wrong reasons. Once upon a time, people worried rather a lot about boys; academically, they were trailing behind girls; culturally, they were struggling to find a place to fit into the modern world. In the last few years the media’s focus has shifted to the various pressures girls […]

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How not to be a perfect mother

‘How not to be a perfect mother’ by Libby Purves

I’ve admitted before that I like to read books about babies / children / parenting. After all, the perfect way to spend my child-free time is to read about how to parent children, right? As you can tell from the rather fluorescent cover image depicting a ‘busy’ mum, this is quite an old book (first […]

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predictably irrational

‘Predictably Irrational’: how we REALLY make decisions

When you make a decision, what influences you? You might expect that your past experiences would have an impact – and they certainly do – but are you sufficiently aware of the other factors influencing your decision-making process? From who orders first in a round of drinks to which new TV we buy, we’re constantly […]

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a very british murder

How murder became an art form and why we read detective fiction

Have you ever considered murder as a form of entertainment? How about murder as an art form? Popular cultural historian Dr Lucy Worsley has. What’s it about? ‘A Very British Murder’ is described in Worsley’s introduction as ‘an exploration of how the British enjoyed and consumed the idea of murder, a phenomenon that dates from […]

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Because when the customer isn't right, they may be entertainingly wrong.

More Weird (and Wonderful) Things Customers Say in Bookshops

‘Can you recommend a book of spells to raise pets from the dead? Just animals you understand – not people. I don’t want my husband coming back.’ Jen Campbell, bookseller at Ripping Yarns and author of ‘Weird Things Customers say in Bookshops’ is back with, well, more weird things customers have said to some poor, […]

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